Homeschooling

The Home School Legal Defense Association says homeschooling is growing by seven percent every year. They have discovered that these children out perform their traditionally educated counterparts by 30-37 percent in all subjects. The results have been amazing. The homeschooling movement graduates 100,000 students each year. So, how do you begin? You’ll be surprised to know that you don’t need a formal education to start. Parents with only a high school diploma do just as well as those with an advanced degree. Make a Commitment The first step in planning to homeschool is to make a commitment to the process. Your level of commitment should be planned one-year at a time. Create a schedule as this will benefit you and your child. Set-up a special area in your home where learning will take place. Organization is your best friend. Know the Law Each state has detailed guidelines and standards which must be met. So, be sure to check with your local homeschooling organization on the requirements you must meet. This will help you to design your homeschool curriculum. Once...

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History of Homeschooling

Many people think of homeschooling as a new phenomenon, but it’s not. For centuries, children received their education at home. Abraham Lincoln received 18 months of homeschooling. Homeschooling was the only option for many people. Often, girls and minorities were exempt from receiving an education. However, by 1900, 34 states adopted compulsory attendance laws. By 1910, 72 percent of American children were receiving a formal education. Ivan Illich Homeschooling was mostly practiced on the quiet and in rural areas. In 1970, Ivan Illich published the book Deschooling Society. It was the catalyst that fostered the debate between homeschooling versus traditional education. He didn’t want to get rid of the public school system completely, but he did want to see an end to mandatory attendance laws. John Holt John Holt coined the term ‘unschooling,’ which sought to remove the structure used in traditional education. He believed the school system sorted kids into groups of economic losers and winners based upon their test scores. In 1976, he wrote Instead of Education: Ways to Help People Do Things Better, which spoke out...

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Pros and Cons of Home Schooling

According to the National Home Education Research Institute, approximately 2.2 million students in the United States are home-schooled. Several years ago, it was considered to be an alternative form of education. However, with more and more parents deciding to educate their kids at home, homeschooling is becoming more mainstream. As with any system however, homeschooling has its pros and cons. The Pros • Educational Freedom You have the freedom to educate according to your child’s learning style and interests. Most schools have a prescribed curriculum that must be followed regardless of your child’s ability. Parents can choose a variety of subjects to teach while also covering the basics. You can also choose to hire a private tutor. • No Peer Pressure Unfortunately, bullying and peer pressure are real world occurrences in many schools. One of the pros of homeschooling is there’s no dress code or formality. It allows your child to discover who they are as an individual without ridicule or the need to be something they’re not. • Nurtures Family Ties Homeschooling fosters stronger bonds between you and...

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Recent News

  • 3 Things Your Child’s Daycare Teacher Wants To Say To You

    Posted by Yvonne Berkley on Sep 22, 2014

    Are you a working parent? It can be tough to send your sweet little tot off to daycare or preschool during the day while you brave the boardroom. As you mind your daily drop-offs and pick-ups, you might wonder what your child’s teachers really think about you and your kid. Here are three things your child’s teacher probably wants to say to you, but might not send home in the monthly newsletter. 1: “Your child’s academic success is a group effort.” By the time you finish your long workday and pick up your child from preschool, the last thing you probably want to do is deal with homework, vocabulary lists, and monotonous children’s stories. After all, isn’t it the preschool teacher’s job to take care of all of that stuff? Although it might seem tempting to pop on the TV for your kid while you sit back and relax, studies have shown that your child’s academic success depends on you too. In fact, studies have shown that your child’s brain grows up to 90% of its original size in the first three years of life. As parents and teachers work together to teach children, their little minds create new connections, and their ability to retain knowledge increases. Unfortunately, many parents take their crucial early education role lightly. For example, only about 5 in 10 preschoolers are read to regularly by their parents. If you want your kid to have a significant head start in their academic career, take their early learning years seriously. Take the time to read books to your child, sing to them, play with them, and...

  • Interested In Homeschooling The Montessori Way? Tips For Bringing The Fundamentals To Life In Your Home

    Posted by Yvonne Berkley on Sep 16, 2014

    Unlike the classical education approach, Montessori classrooms don’t rely on a series of textbooks and exams. Instead, the Montessori style uses hands-on learning that’s focused on the child’s interests. This child-centered method is no longer limited to private Montessori schools, but has also gained popularity in the homeschool community. If you’re a homeschooler who is new to Montessori learning, here’s a look at some of the fundamentals of a Montessori education and how to implement them. Physical Activity Enhances Learning The hands-on style of a Montessori classroom encourages movement. One of the core principles of this type of learning is that movement and physical activity are directly connected to your cognitive function. As a result of that connection, movement enhances the ability to learn and think. Provide kids with manipulatives and active tasks to teach new skills. Providing Choices Gives Kids Some Educational Control Giving kids the freedom to make choices related to their learning and their schedule can actually improve their well-being and educational progress. To encourage this type of freedom, create a list of assignments that need to be done for the day and allow each child to determine how and in what order he or she will complete them. Select silent reading material that reinforces whatever skills you are currently focusing on and put them together in a reading basket. Make that basket available for reading material. By providing the basket, the child feels as though he or she has a choice what to read. You’re providing the freedom of choice within specified boundaries. Place a basket of pre-selected snacks in an accessible location. By building...

  • College Application 101: Guiding Your Child Through This Difficult Process

    Posted by Yvonne Berkley on Sep 10, 2014

    High school students, today, are under a tremendous amount of stress to choose and apply for the right college. But what is the right college? The truth is that there is no one correct answer. Yet, students all over the United States are pinning all of their hopes on getting accepted into colleges they believe are their dream destinations. And when they don’t get in to that one special college, many end up being bitterly disappointed. That’s why it’s so important for you, as the parent, to help your child deal with the stress of this difficult time period.  Increase Your Child’s Odds Your children may have worked extremely hard in order to get accepted by their dream colleges. Perhaps, they’ve taken a slew of AP classes, gotten almost straight As, rocked the SATs and engaged in several different extracurricular activities. Unfortunately, today, that may not be enough. According to the New York Times, some elite colleges only accepted five percent of their applicants in 2014. And, sadly, many of the students that received rejection letters were extremely bright, successful students that admissions directors called “indistinguishable” from those that were accepted. So chances are high these days that your child may receive a rejection letter from a dream school. That’s why you should:  Encourage your children to apply to a number of colleges. Although there is no right or wrong number, Collegeboard suggests that your student should apply to between five and eight colleges. Have them apply to a variety of colleges. For example, your child should select approximately one or two reach colleges, a few safety schools, and a couple...